Blue Hippo Tang Fish “Paracanthurus Hepatus”

blue hippo tang

The blue hippo tang is a popular fish among aquarium hobbyists and pet owners. They are also known as the blue surgeonfish, blue doctorfish, and blue monkeyface. They are members of the family Acanthuridae in the order Perciformes. Hippo tangs are native to Fiji but can be found in other parts of the world such as Indonesia, Australia, Polynesia, Japan, Hawaii, and California’s Great Barrier Reef.

Blue hippo tangs are one of the most exotic fish in the saltwater aquarium trade. They are also among the easiest to care for because they can live in a wide range of water conditions, making them perfect for beginners.

They are one of the most popular saltwater aquarium fish due to their bright colors and playful personality.

Here is everything you need to know about blue hippo tangs!

Origin and descriptions

blue hippo tang

Blue hippo tangs originate from the warm waters of Indonesia. They are a member of the surgeonfish family and have very sharp noses that they use to eat algae off rocks. Their bodies tend to be a bluish color with black, white, or yellow accents throughout their body depending on how old they are.

They are known to be very friendly with other fish in their tank, but they can also be aggressive towards each other when not given enough space.

Hippo tangs get to around eight inches long and do best in aquariums over 100 gallons so there is plenty of room for them to swim freely. If you plan on getting one or more of these fish, be prepared to set up a large tank and make sure you have plenty of algae-based food to feed them.

Species profile

The blue hippo tang is a species of fish that is found in the tropical waters of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. They can grow up to 12 inches in length and are typically a bright blue color with black markings on their fins. These charismatic creatures are popular among aquarium enthusiasts and make an excellent addition to any saltwater tank.

Scientific name

The scientific name for the blue hippo tang is Paracanthurus hepatus.

Color and appearance

Pacific blue tang fish

The blue hippo tang is a bright blue fish with black markings on their fins. They can grow up to 12 inches in length.

They are popular among aquarium enthusiasts and make an excellent addition to any saltwater tank. Their bright blue color and black markings are sure to add personality and interest to your tank set-up.

They are a species of fish that is found in the tropical waters of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. They can grow up to 12 inches in length and are typically a bright blue color with black markings on their fins. These charismatic creatures are popular among aquarium enthusiasts and make an excellent addition to any saltwater tank.

Range and habitat

The blue hippo tang is a beautiful fish that can be found in a wide range of habitats, from the open ocean to coral reefs. They are popular choices for home aquariums because they are active and fast swimmers. They should be fed a plant-based diet consisting of seaweed and algae, in addition to other vegetables.

They can be found at depths of up to 150 feet (45 meters) and in water temperatures ranging from 72 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit (22 to 29 degrees Celsius).

Blue hippo tangs are very active and fast swimmers, making them a popular choice for home aquariums. They can reach speeds of up to three miles per hour (five kilometers per hour) and have been known to jump out of tanks that are not covered.

The blue hippo tang is an herbivore, so it should be fed a plant-based diet consisting of seaweed and algae in addition to other vegetables. They are susceptible to the same diseases as saltwater fish that live in coral reefs (Coral Disease) because they inhabit similar environments.

Blue hippo tang size

The blue hippo tang can grow up to 12 inches (30 centimeters) in length, making it one of the larger members of the Tang family.

Blue hippo tang tank size

Because of its large size and active nature, the blue hippo tang will require a minimum tank size of at least 100 gallons (400 liters). It is not advisable to house it with other fish because they may nip at this Tang’s fins. They may also be aggressive towards smaller species like gobies and blennies.

Life cycle

The blue hippo tang is a fish that can grow to be about 40 cm. This species of fish have been known to live up to 15 years in the wild, but under captive conditions, they tend to only live from five to ten years old. The female will lay her eggs on rocks or corals where they are fertilized by the male.

Then they are left to their own devices until the eggs hatch around four days later when they are released into the sea as juveniles with no parental care following them.

The blue hippo tang will eat a varied diet of both plant and animal matter in order to survive. They are omnivorous but prefer to scavenge on algae and other small invertebrates. Juveniles tend to be more colorful than adults and will lose their bright hues as they age.

Are they aggressive or peaceful?

The blue hippo tang is a popular fish to keep in aquariums and they are not aggressive. They will only display aggression when their tank has another fish that may be similar to them such as the yellow tang or clownfish, but otherwise, they can coexist with other peaceful species.

They tend to get along well with others of their own kind, so if there are multiple blue hippo tangs in the tank, they will not fight for territory.

Blue hippo tang care

Pacific blue tang fish

The blue hippo tang is a hardy fish and relatively easy to care for. They do best in an aquarium with plenty of live rock and coral where they can scavenge for food.

They will need at least a 55 gallon tank, but preferably larger, as they grow up to 40 cm in length. The water should be kept between 72 and 78 degrees Fahrenheit.

Blue hippo tang diet

The blue hippo tang is a herbivore and will primarily eat algae-based foods, but they also need to be given meaty foods such as brine shrimp, Mysis or krill, and even pellet food made for herbivores like seaweed sheets.

They should have a varied diet to ensure good health.

Tank mates

The blue hippo tang can be kept with other fish, but should not be housed with aggressive or territorial fish.

Some good tank mates include other Tangs, Butterflyfish, Pipefish, Angelfish, Goby Fish, Cleaner Shrimp, Sea Urchins, and so on.

Water conditions

Water quality is very important for the blue hippo tang and should be kept at above-average values. The pH level of the water should ideally be between eight and nine; anything lower than this may cause health problems.

They need to have a temperature range from 72 to 78 degrees Fahrenheit (22 – 26 Celsius). Water hardness should be kept at about 12 dGH.

The water should have a salinity level of one to five parts per thousand, or 35-37 PSU. The blue hippo tang is considered to be an advanced fish for the saltwater aquarium beginner and requires a minimum tank size of 55 gallons with plenty of live rock and coral where they can find food.

Breeding

Pacific blue tang fish

Breeding blue hippo tangs is a great way to get more fish for your aquarium. The first step in breeding these animals is getting them ready to breed. This means feeding them well and putting them into a large tank with lots of hiding spaces, so they feel secure enough to do their business without being spooked by other fish.

When they feel comfortable enough to breed, the male will start courting the female by swimming around her and flaring his fins out. They will eventually get on each other’s sides and do a dance where their bellies meet in what is referred to as “spawning”. The eggs that are released during this process can be removed from the tank so they don’t get eaten by other fish, and can be hatched in a separate tank.

After the eggs are released, the parents should be removed so that they aren’t tempted to eat their own young. You want to leave them together for at least 24 hours after spawning, giving them time to produce more than one batch of fertilized eggs.

If you’re having trouble getting your blue hippo tangs to breed, there are a few things you can do. One is to get them on different feeding schedules; if they’re both eating well then they’ll be more likely to want to mate. You can also try adding some new fish to their tank, as this will make them feel more comfortable and might trigger the breeding instinct.

Blue hippo tang lifespan

Blue hippo tangs can live for up to 15 years in captivity, making them a great addition to your aquarium. In the wild they typically live around five years, so you’ll want to make sure you provide them with a good home if you’re going to keep them as pets.

Parasites and diseases

The blue hippo tang is susceptible to ich, which can be transmitted through your tank water. They’re also at risk for a condition called head and lateral line erosion (HLLE), though not all fish will get it. There’s no treatment available if they do contract HLLE, but you can make their life more comfortable by reducing the stress levels in their tank.

Blue hippo tangs are also prone to getting parasitic flatworms, which can be treated with medication if you catch them early. Make sure to quarantine any new fish before adding them to your main tank, as this will help reduce the chances of your fish contracting a disease.

Predators

The blue hippo tang is preyed upon by a variety of predators, both in the wild and in captivity. Sharks, groupers, barracudas, and other large fish are known to eat them. In addition, they can be cannibalistic, so smaller individuals may be at risk of being eaten by their own kind. They are also preyed upon by marine mammals, such as dolphins and seals.

In captivity, they are often targeted by large aquarium fish, such as the arowana. They are also susceptible to parasitic infections, which can be deadly. It is therefore important to take measures to protect them from predators and parasites if you choose to keep them.

Does it make good pets?

The blue hippo tang is a popular choice for aquarium enthusiasts. They are peaceful and active, making them an interesting addition to the tank for your family or friends. However, they do require special care in order to stay healthy.

To start with, they live in cold water (around 72 degrees Fahrenheit), so you will need an aquarium chiller to keep the temperature down. They also need plenty of space; a minimum tank size of 125 gallons is recommended.

Conclusions

In summary, the blue hippo tang is a beautiful fish that will add an interesting touch to your aquarium. They are not hardy or forgiving, though; make sure you do plenty of research before choosing them as pets.